Category Archive: Music History

Feb 17

History Preserved: Guarneri, Amati & Stradivarius Violins

This weekend I had the great opportunity to travel to New York City and spend time at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. I was especially excited about their wing dedicated to musical instruments with some incredible stringed instruments on display, including original violins by makers Stradivari, Amati, and Guarneri as well as other 16th century …

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Feb 10

How to Keep Classical Music Alive

How can we keep classical music from ending up six feet under? (Photo by Ben Salter) There are plenty of saucy articles floating around questioning classical music as a dying art, such as these treasures: “Classical music in America is dead” by Mark Vanhoenacke, slate.com “Classical Music Is Not Dead” by Matthew Kassel, The New …

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Jul 08

Suzuki vs. Traditional Method

There is so much confusion surrounding what the difference is between traditional and Suzuki method violin lessons. What’s the difference? Is one better? How do you choose? I, personally, started on the Suzuki method at the age of three, went through two years of Suzuki pedagogy training,  and currently have a studio of thirty students …

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Jun 03

Making It Your Own: The Interpretation of Music

Here in our new Kennedy Violins location, we’ve opened a new studio for private lessons with local teachers in the area. Students are coming in with sheets of music and saying, in one way or another, “Show me how to play this.” As the student learns the piece, it begins to take form, becoming something …

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Feb 12

A Brief History of the Serenade

With Valentine’s Day less than 48 hours away, you might be sweating bullets trying to come up with some way–any way–to impress that special someone. Well, I’m going let you in on a little secret. There is nothing that wins someone over like MUSIC. Sure, you could always gift your sweetheart a violin. But it’s …

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Jan 07

Music Theory Basics Part 3: Key Signatures

In the first two parts of Music Theory Basics, we covered a lot of topics.  Today we will only be focusing on one topic: key signatures.  There are, however, several layers to this concept.  I will try an lay it out in a way that makes it a tasty parfait and not an onion. Let’s …

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Dec 28

Stereotypes & Misconceptions Part II: Classical Music is Relaxing

Below is a continuation of my previous post, Stereotypes & Misconceptions Part I: Classical Music is for Rich People. 6. Classical music is relaxing. Sometimes, when I’m washing dishes, I’ll turn on one of three things: talk radio, classical music, pop, or Broadway music. Interestingly enough, while I do find most pieces on the classical …

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Dec 21

Stereotypes & Misconceptions Part I: Classical Music is for Rich People

Some strange kind of stigma has become associated with classical music, and I want to get to the bottom of it. It isn’t unusual for stereotypes about classical music and its listeners or performers to exist; after all, there are similarly plenty of opinions out there about Twilight-loving teenagers, Bronies, Trekkies, band geeks, and people …

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Nov 12

Classical Music Genres of the Common Practice Period

Playing music is more than just playing notes on a page. Simply playing the notes would be like saying words without expression, asking questions without the rising inflection at the end of the phrase, writing without punctuation, eating food without salt or spices, seeing the world without color . . . you get it. Creating …

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Sep 04

Pit Orchestra: The Land Down Under

One of my most memorable experiences in high school was my very first time playing in a pit orchestra. I remember it very clearly: the musical was called The Nifty Fifties, all the girls on stage wore poodle skirts, and there was a song called “The Blob” about the 1958 sci-fi horror film with choreography …

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